Steven Boyce, PhD

Research Interests

  • Regenerative medicine
  • Engineered skin substitutes; autologous or allogeneic
  • Human cell isolation, propagation and cryopreservation
  • Implantable and biodegradable biopolymers
  • Translational research
  • Technology transfer to commercialization

Biography

Steven Boyce, PhD, serves currently as Professor in the Department of Surgery at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and as Senior Investigator in the Research Department of the Shriners Hospitals for Children – Cincinnati.  He trained in the Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology at the University of Colorado, and spent his post-doctoral years in the Department of Surgery at the University of California San Diego.  With interests and expertise in engineering of model systems for anatomy and physiology of human skin, Dr. Boyce has designed and tested engineered skin substitutes consisting of cultured human skin cells and degradable biopolymer scaffolds for closure of severe burns, reconstructive surgery, and studies in vitro of skin biology and pathology

Education and Training

BA: 1974, Biological Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder

PhD: 1984, Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology; University of Colorado at Boulder

Post-doctoral: 1985-1988, Tissue engineering and translational research; Surgery, University of California San Diego

Publications (selected from 135 original articles; 215 abstracts; 19 patents; 18 book chapters, and 150 invited presentations)

Articles:

  1. Hansbrough JF, ST Boyce, ML Cooper and TJ Foreman.   Burn wound closure with cultured human keratinocytes and fibroblasts attached to a collagen-GAG substrate.  J Amer Med Assn 262:2125-2130.
  1. Boyce ST, D Greenhalgh, RJ Kagan, T Housinger, M Rieman, C Childress and GD Warden.   Skin anatomy and antigen expression after burn wound closure with composite grafts of cultured skin cells and biopolymers.  Plast Reconstr Surg 91(4):632-641.
  1. Boyce ST, MJ Goretsky, DG Greenhalgh, RJ Kagan, MT Rieman, and GD Warden.   Comparative assessment of cultured skin substitutes and native skin autograft for treatment of full-thickness burns.  Annals of Surgery 222(6):743-752.
  1. Boyce ST, RJ Kagan, NA Meyer, KP Yakuboff, and GD Warden.   The 1999 Clinical Research Award.  Cultured skin substitutes combined with Integra Artificial Skin to replace native skin autograft and allograft for the closure of excised, full-thickness burns.  J Burn Care Rehabil 20:453-461.
  1. Passaretti D, D Billmire, R Kagan, J Corcoran, and S Boyce.   Autologous cultured skin substitutes conserve donor skin autograft in elective treatment of giant congenital melanocytic nevus.  Plast Reconstr Surg 114(6):1523-1528.
  1. Boyce ST, RJ Kagan, DG Greenhalgh, KP Yakuboff, P Warner, T Palmieri and GD Warden.   Cultured skin substitutes reduce requirements for harvesting of skin autograft for closure of excised, full-thickness burns.  J Trauma 60(4):821-829.
  1. Chavez-Munoz C, R Hartwell, E Rahmani-Neishabour, F Forouzandeh, RB Jalili, M Jafarnejad, ST Boyce, and A Ghahary.   Application of an Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase (IDO) expressing skin substitute improves scar formation in a fibrotic animal model.  J Invest Dermatol 132(5):1501-1505. PMID: 22297642.
  1. Supp DM, JM Hahn, K Glaser, KL McFarland, and ST Boyce. 2012. Differential contributions of deep and superficial keloid fibroblasts revealed using a novel in vivo model of keloid scar. Plast Reconstruct Surg 129(6):1259-71. PMID: 22634643.
  1. Supp DM, K Glaser, JM Hahn, KL McFarland, ST Boyce.   Abnormal responses of keloid tissue to wounding identified using an in vitro model system.  Eplasty 12:184-187. PMID:22536458.
  1. Boyce ST.   In, A tribute to Richard G. Ham, Ph.D., 1932-2011; ed., WL McKeehan.  In Vitro Cell and Developmental Biology 48(5):259-70.  PMID:22580908
  1. Boyce ST, RK Rice, KC Lynch, AP Supp, VB Swope, RJ Kagan, and DM Supp.   Assessment of replication rates of human keratinocytes in engineered skin substitutes grafted to athymic mice.  Wound Repair Regen 20(4):544-51. PMID:22672265.
  1. Sriwiriyanont P, KA Lynch, EA Maier, JM Hahn, DM Supp, and ST Boyce. 2012. Morphogenesis of chimeric hair follicles in engineered skin substitutes with human keratinocytes and murine dermal papilla cells.  Exp Dermatol 21(10):783-785.  PMID:23078401.
  1. Sriwiriyanont P, KA Lynch, KL McFarland, DM Supp, and ST Boyce.   Characterization of hair follicle development in engineered skin substitutes. PLoS-ONE 8(6):e65664. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0065664.
  1. Singer, AG, DH Ahrenholz, P Chang, RAF Clark, R Fey, P Fidler, W Garner, N Gibran, D Greenhalgh, S Honari, L Jones, R Kagan, J Kirby, J Leggett, N Meyer, C Reigart, K Richey, L Rosenberg, J Weber, B Wiggins, and ST Boyce.   Burn wound healing outcomes.  J Burn Care and Res 34(4):381-385. doi:10.197/BCR.0b01e31828cb249.
  1. Hahn, JK, K Glaser, KL McFarland, B Aronow, ST Boyce, and DM Supp.  Keloid-derived keratinocytes exhibit an abnormal gene expression profile consistent with a distinct causal role in keloid pathology.  Wound Repair Regen 21:530-544.  doi:10.1111/wrr.12060.
  1. Osterburg AR, Hexley P, Supp DM, Robinson CT, Noel G, Ogle C, Boyce ST, Aronow BJ, Babcock GF. Concerns over interspecies transcriptional comparisons in mice and humans after trauma. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. doi/10.1073/pnas.1306033110
  1. Rieman MT, A Neeley, ST Boyce, WJ Kossenjans, PJ Durkee, JM Zembrodt, BK Puthoff, and RJ Kagan.   Amish Burn Ointment (ABO) and burdock leaf dressings: assessments of antimicrobial & cytotoxic activities. J Burn Care Res 35(4):e217-e223. doi:10.1097/BCR.0b013e3182a23228.
  1. Sander EA, KA Lynch, and ST Boyce.   Development of mechanical properties of engineered skin substitutes after grafting to athymic mice. J Biomech Eng 136(5):051008­-1 – 051008-7.  doi:10.1115/1.4026290.
  1. Boyce ST, RL Zimmerman, and DM Supp.   Tumorigenicity testing of cultured human melanocytes for restoration of skin color in engineered skin substitutes.  Cell Transplantation 24:1423-1429.  doi: 10.3727/096368914X683052.  PMID:25199067.
  1. Lloyd CM, JA Besse, and ST Boyce.   Controlled rate freezing to regulate the structure of collagen-glycosaminoglycan scaffolds in engineered skin substitutes.  J Biomed Mater Res – part B; doi: 10.1002/jbm.b.33253, e-pub, 18Aug2014.
  1. Boyce ST, PS Simpson, MT Rieman, P Warner, KP Yakuboff, JK Bailey, JK Nelson, LA Fowler, and RJ Kagan.   Randomized, paired-site, comparison of autologous engineered skin substitutes and split-thickness skin autograft for extensive, full-thickness burns.  J Burn Care Res, 8 Jul 2016 [Epub ahead of print].  doi: 10.1097/BCR.0000000000000401  PMID:27404165.
  1. Zhou L, K Yang, M Xu, T Andl, SE Millar, S Boyce, and Y Zhang.   Activating β-catenin signaling in CD133-positive dermal papilla cells increases hair inductivity. FEBS J, 2016 Aug; 283(15):2823-35. doi: 10.1111/febs.13784. Epub, 11 Jul 2016.
  1. Supp DM, JM Hahn, KL McFarland, KA Combs, KSS Lee, B Inceoglu, D Wan, ST Boyce, and BD Hammock. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition and topical epoxyeicosatrienoic acid treatment improve vascularization of engineered skin substitutes after transplantation to mice.  Plast Reconstr Surg Global, in press.
  1. Ventura SA, L Esfandiari, J Heikenfeld, ST Boyce, Y Park, and GB Kasting. 2017. Cortisol extraction through human skin by reverse iontophoresis. Bioelectrochemistry, in press.
  1. AJ Singer and ST Boyce.   State of the science: burn wound healing, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.  J Burn Care Res, in press.

Book chapters:

  1. Supp DM and Boyce ST.   Bioengineering of human skin substitutes.  Chapter 47; In, “Biomedical Engineering Handbook”; editors, JP Fisher and AG Mikos; CRC Press, Inc.; Boca Raton, FL. pp 47-1 to 47-17.
  1. Powell HM and ST Boyce.   Cultured skin substitutes.  Chapter 12 in: “Biomaterials for Treating Skin Loss”; editors, D Orgill and C Blanco; Woodhead Publishing, Ltd; Abington, UK.
  1. Powell HM and ST Boyce.   Tissue engineering of skin.  In, “An introduction to biomaterials and their applications”; 2nd Edition; eds., Scott Guelcher, Jeffrey O. Hollinger.  CRC Press, Inc; Boca Raton, FL.
  1. Boyce ST.   Engineered skin substitutes: principles and practices.  In, “Burns: Critical Care and Surgery”, second edition; editors, RL Zapata-Sirvent, CJ Jimenez-Castillo, J Besso; Ateproca Press; Caracas, Venezuela.
  1. Boyce ST.   Translational research with engineered skin substitutes.  In, “Burns: Critical Care and Surgery”, second edition; editors, RL Zapata-Sirvent, CJ Jimenez-Castillo, J Besso; Ateproca Press; Caracas, Venezuela.
  1. Boyce ST and DM Supp.   Biologic skin substitutes.  Chapter 11 in, “Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine of Skin”; eds., MZ Albanna and JH Holmes IV; Elsevier Press; NY, NY, p. 211-238. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-801654-1.00011-5

Patents:

  1. Boyce ST.   US Patent 6,905,105, “Apparatus for preparing a biocompatible matrix”.  Assignees: University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST.   US Patent 7,452,720B2, “Apparatus for preparing a biocompatible matrix”.  Assignees: University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST.   European Patent #1483373, “A surgical device for skin therapy or testing”.  Assignees: University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST. US Patent 7,741,116, “A surgical device for skin therapy or testing”.  Assignees: University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST.   Japanese Patent #4,555,576, “A surgical device for skin therapy or testing”.  Assignees: University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST.   Canadian Patent #2,478,100, “Apparatus for preparing a biocompatible matrix”.  Assignees:  University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST.   European Patent #1,483,365, “Apparatus for preparing a biocompatible matrix”.  Assignees:  University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST. US Patent 8,450,108, “A surgical device for skin therapy or testing”.  Assignees: University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST.   Japanese Patent #5,535,446, “A surgical device for skin therapy or testing”.  Assignees: University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.

  2. Boyce ST.   US Patent 8,765,468, “A surgical device for skin therapy or testing”.  Assignees: University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST.   US Patent 9,089,417, “A surgical device for skin therapy or testing”.  Assignees:  University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST. 2016. European Patent #2,075,330 B1 “A method of producing a cultured skin device”. Assignees:  University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.
  1. Boyce ST. 2016. European Patent #2,302,035 B1, “A method of producing a cultured skin device”. Assignees:  University of Cincinnati and Shriners Hospitals for Children.

Grants (current as of Jan 2017)

Sponsor:                 Department of Defense; W81XWH-13-2-0052

Title:                        Armed Forces Institute for Regenerative Medicine

Position:                  Project Leader, 30%

Dates:                     10/1/13 – 2/28/17                                                                               $ 1,178,000

 

Sponsor:                 NIH: 1R21AR064341-01A1

Title:                        Engineering of human sebaceous glands

Position:                  Principal Investigator, 15%

Dates:                     09/01/14 – 7/31/17                                                                               $ 430,000

 

Sponsor:                 Shriners of North America; SHC #84050

Title:                        Special Shared Facility – Microscopy and Imaging

Position:                  Principal Investigator, 5%

Dates:                     01/01/08 – 12/31/17                                                                            $ 645,000

 

Sponsor:                 Shriners of North America; SHC #85410

Title:                        Induction of hair follicles in engineered human skin

Position:                  Principal Investigator, 15%

Dates:                     01/01/15 – 12/31/17                                                                              $ 525,000

 

Sponsor:                 UCRI/Procter & Gamble

Title:                        Biomarkers of skin hydration

Position:                  Collaborator, 1%

Dates:                     06/15/15 – 06/14/17                                                                              $ 210,000

 

Sponsor:                 UCRI/Procter & Gamble

Title:                        Metabolism of ZPT in skin

Position:                  Collaborator, 1%

Dates:                     06/15/16 – 06/14/18                                                                              $ 210,000

 

Sponsor:                 Shriners of North America; SHC #70012

Title:                        Planning for clinical trial of engineered skin with pigment

Position:                 Principal Investigator, 15%

Dates:                     01/01/17 – 12/31/17                                                                                 $59,200

 

Sponsor:                 Shriners of North America; SHC #85200

Title:                        Restoration of skin color by transplantation of cultured melanocytes

Position:                  Principal Investigator, 20%

Dates:                     01/01/17 – 12/31/19                                                                              $ 750,000

 

Sponsor:                 Shriners of North America; SHC #85800

Title:                        Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors for angiogenesis in engineered skin

Position:                  Co-Investigator, 5%; (PI, DM Supp)

Dates:                     01/01/17 – 12/31/20                                                                           $ 1,000,000

Contact

Steven Boyce, PhD
Senior Investigator
Research
[email protected]

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