At Shriners Hospitals for Children—Cincinnati, the health and safety of our patients, families, volunteers and staff is our top priority. With the rapidly evolving situation regarding coronavirus (COVID-19,) we are closely monitoring local health departments and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC,) and are actively following their recommendations.

We are working diligently to reschedule appointments postponed during the quarantine. We also understand you may feel some anxiety about bringing your child into the hospital. Our plans to restart routine care have been thoughtfully developed and implemented to keep everyone safe. We are also scheduling some appointments for new patients. If you have any questions, please call the hospital at 855-206-2096.

Families that have appointments of any kind are asked to arrive with ONLY ONE parent or guardian and no additional family members or guests.

When you arrive for your appointment, if you and your child are not already wearing a mask, you will receive one. You will both be screened for illness and will notice new safety precautions in place to promote clean hands, a clean environment, and social distancing.

We are here for you, and look forward to seeing you soon.

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Ear deformity care

Protruding ears

Protruding ears is a condition in which the folds of the ear cartilage have not developed normally. This causes the ear to stick out from the side of the head. This can be an embarrassing feature and cause emotional distress to the developing child. Most opt for surgical correction of this condition, called an otoplasty. This surgery is usually performed when the child is around 6 years of age once the cartilage is completely formed. 

Protuding Ears


Lop ear

Congenital lop ear is when a protrusion occurs at the top portion of the ear. This can cause the cartilage to flop over, giving a bent or drooping appearance. Most opt for surgical correction of this condition, called an otoplasty.

Lop Ear 1  Lop Ear 2



Atresia

Atresia is a complete absence of the external ear canal, which is almost always accompanied by abnormalities of the middle ear bones, as well as the external ear.

Atresia 1  Atresia 2  Atresia 3


Traumatic ear deformity

With traumatic injuries to the ear from dog bites, car accidents, etc., surgical reconstruction can be accomplished in many cases. Surgical ear reconstruction can be done in almost all cases of microtia, atresia, and ears destroyed or missing due to traumatic injury.

Meet our physicians

Haithem Elhadi Babiker, M.D., D.M.D.
Christopher Gordon, M.D., FACS, FAAP
W. John Kitzmiller, M.D., FACS
Salim Mancho, D.O., FACS
Brian Pan, M.D., FACS
Scott J. Rapp, M.D., FACS
Ann Schwentker, M.D.

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